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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2012, Article ID 512976, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/512976
Clinical Study

N-Acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) Genotype: A Risk Factor for Urinary Bladder Cancer in a Lebanese Population

1Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Balamand, Beirut 1100-2807, Lebanon
2School of Public Health, University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
3Urology Department, St. George Hospital University Medical Center, Faculty of Medicine, University of Balamand, Beirut 1100-2807, Lebanon
4Medical Laboratory Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Balamand, P.O. Box 166378 Ashrafieh, Beirut 1100-2807, Lebanon

Received 8 March 2012; Revised 14 May 2012; Accepted 27 May 2012

Academic Editor: Anirban P. Mitra

Copyright © 2012 Ibrahim A. Yassine et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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