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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2012, Article ID 537861, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/537861
Review Article

Glioma Revisited: From Neurogenesis and Cancer Stem Cells to the Epigenetic Regulation of the Niche

1Cancer Research Laboratory, University Hospital Research Center (CPE-HCPA), Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-903 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
2Laboratory of Neuropharmacology and Neural Tumor Biology, Department of Pharmacology, Institute for Basic Health Sciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-903 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
3Children’s Cancer Institute and Pediatric Oncology Unit, Federal University Hospital (HCPA), 90035-903 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
4National Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM), 90035-903 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
5Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-903 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
6Medical Sciences Program, School of Medicine, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-903 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil

Received 10 March 2012; Revised 11 June 2012; Accepted 26 June 2012

Academic Editor: Fabian Benencia

Copyright © 2012 Felipe de Almeida Sassi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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