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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 524101, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/524101
Review Article

Phosphoglycerate Dehydrogenase: Potential Therapeutic Target and Putative Metabolic Oncogene

1Center for Surgery and Public Health, Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health, Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 1620 Tremont Street, Boston, MA 02120, USA
2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA

Received 4 August 2014; Revised 14 November 2014; Accepted 18 November 2014; Published 9 December 2014

Academic Editor: Rolf Bjerkvig

Copyright © 2014 Cheryl K. Zogg. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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