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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 865816, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/865816
Review Article

The Regulatory Role of MicroRNAs in EMT and Cancer

Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet Huddinge, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden

Received 21 August 2014; Accepted 9 October 2014

Academic Editor: Panos Papageorgis

Copyright © 2015 Apostolos Zaravinos. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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