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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2016, Article ID 1872627, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1872627
Research Article

The Role of Pulmonary Veins in Cancer Progression from a Computed Tomography Viewpoint

1Division of Hemato-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang-Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan
2Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang-Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan
3Division of Chest, Department of Internal Medicine, Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang-Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan
4Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention and Department of Internal Medicine, Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang-Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan

Received 20 April 2016; Accepted 25 August 2016

Academic Editor: Sofia D. Merajver

Copyright © 2016 Chuang-Chi Liaw et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. We studied the role of pulmonary veins in cancer progression using computed tomography (CT) scans. Methods. We obtained data from 260 patients with pulmonary vein obstruction syndrome (PVOS). We used CT scans to investigate pulmonary lesions in relation to pulmonary veins. We divided the lesions into central and peripheral lesions by their anatomical location: in the lung parenchymal tissue or pulmonary vein; in the superior or inferior pulmonary vein; and by unilateral or bilateral presence in the lungs. Results. Of the 260 PVOS patients, 226 (87%) had central lesions, 231 (89%) had peripheral lesions, and 190 (75%) had mixed central and peripheral lesions. Among the 226 central lesions, 93% had lesions within the superior pulmonary vein, either bilaterally or unilaterally. Among the 231 peripheral lesions, 65% involved bilateral lungs, 70% involved lesions within the inferior pulmonary veins, and 23% had obvious metastatic extensions into the left atrium. All patients exhibited nodules within their pulmonary veins. The predeath status included respiratory failure (40%) and loss of consciousness (60%). Conclusion. CT scans play an important role in following tumor progression within pulmonary veins. Besides respiratory distress, PVOS cancer cells entering centrally can result in cardiac and cerebral events and loss of consciousness or can metastasize peripherally from the pulmonary veins to the lungs.