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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2019, Article ID 7239206, 36 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/7239206
Review Article

Not Only Mutations Matter: Molecular Picture of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Emerging from Transcriptome Studies

Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry Polish Academy of Sciences, Poznan, Poland

Correspondence should be addressed to Luiza Handschuh; lp.nanzop.hcbi@nahaziul

Received 26 April 2019; Accepted 12 June 2019; Published 30 July 2019

Guest Editor: Annalisa Lonetti

Copyright © 2019 Luiza Handschuh. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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