Journal of Oncology

Infection-Associated Cancers


Publishing date
01 Oct 2019
Status
Published
Submission deadline
31 May 2019

1Shimane University, Shimane, Japan

2Osaka University, Osaka, Japan

3Nagoya Medical Center, Nagoya, Japan


Infection-Associated Cancers

Description

In the beginning of the 20th century, Peyton Rous injected filtered extracts obtained from chicken sarcomas into healthy chickens to generate new sarcomas. After this finding, a growing number of pathogens have been found to be oncogenic. Microorganisms and their metabolites, as well as chronic inflammation, have also been considered to cause cancers. For example, the human papillomavirus (HPV) causes cervical squamous cell carcinoma and oropharyngeal cancer. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) causes Burkitt lymphoma, nasopharyngeal cancer, and stomach cancer. Hepatitis B and C virus (HBV and HCV) cause hepatocellular carcinoma. Human T lymphotropic virus (HTLV), human herpes virus type 8 (HHV8), and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) are causative agents for adult T cell leukemia, Kaposi's sarcoma, and gastric cancer, respectively.

The mechanisms by which pathogenic microorganisms cause cancer vary. In the case of HPV, EBV, and HTLV, host cell proliferation is promoted by viral oncogenes suppressing the function of the p53 gene and/or the Retinoblastoma (RB) gene. In the case of HBV and HCV, inflammation of hepatic cells increases the risk of cancer development. Not only does H. pylori cause gastritis, but its toxins can promote gastric cancer. It is also known that retrovirus infection causes tumor suppressor gene deficiency during the process of integration into the host gene. However, infection by these microorganisms is only the initial step of carcinogenesis, and cancer cannot occur by a single infection step alone. One underexplored way to study the relationship between infections and oncogenic events is to investigate the indirect role of infectious organisms that are not considered to be oncogenic. The oncogenic process may result from interactions between immune pathways involved in protection against infectious agents as well as cancer cells.

Almost 20% of all cancers worldwide are estimated to be associated with infections. However, cancers caused by infection include many preventable factors, such as lifestyle. We believe effective preventive measures exist for some of them, which include a potential target for novel cancer diagnostics, therapeutic approaches, and the possibility of prevention by vaccination.

This special issue welcomes papers concerning current knowledge of infection-associated cancers, spanning basic biology, and potential clinical applications.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Molecular mechanisms to understand infection attributed cancers
  • Tumor microenvironment including tumor immune response
  • Development of novel biomarker for diagnosis and for predicting prognosis
  • Animal models for studying infection-associated cancers
  • New treatment or preventive strategy for infection-associated cancers

Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2020
  • - Article ID 4979131
  • - Editorial

Infection-Associated Cancers

Hironori Yoshiyama | Keiji Ueda | ... | Hisashi Iizasa
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2020
  • - Article ID 8958192
  • - Research Article

Seroprevalence of Human Betaretrovirus Surface Protein Antibodies in Patients with Breast Cancer and Liver Disease

Guangzhi Zhang | Kiandokht Bashiri | ... | Andrew L. Mason
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2019
  • - Article ID 5415761
  • - Research Article

DNA Hypermethylation Downregulates Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (TERT) during H. pylori-Induced Chronic Inflammation

Françoise I. Bussière | Valérie Michel | ... | Eliette Touati
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2019
  • - Article ID 3257939
  • - Review Article

Human Papillomavirus Infection and Cervical Cancer: Epidemiology, Screening, and Vaccination—Review of Current Perspectives

Chee Kai Chan | Gulzhanat Aimagambetova | ... | Azliyati Azizan
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2019
  • - Article ID 5636272
  • - Review Article

The Four Horsemen in Colon Cancer

Marco Antonio Hernández-Luna | Sergio López-Briones | Rosendo Luria-Pérez
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2019
  • - Article ID 6018269
  • - Research Article

Human Papillomavirus and Anal Cancer: Prevalence, Genotype Distribution, and Prognosis Aspects from Midwestern Region of Brazil

Larisse Silva Dalla Libera | Keila Patrícia Almeida de Carvalho | ... | Vera Aparecida Saddi
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2019
  • - Article ID 2128410
  • - Review Article

The Role of Deubiquitinases in Oncovirus and Host Interactions

Yueshuo Li | Feng Shi | ... | Ya Cao
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2019
  • - Article ID 8062176
  • - Research Article

Cervical Human Papillomavirus Prevalence, Genotypes, and Associated Risk Factors among Female Sex Workers in Greater Accra, Ghana

Abdul Rashid Adams | Priscillia Awo Nortey | ... | Edwin Kwame Wiredu
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2019
  • - Article ID 9173729
  • - Review Article

Advances in the Management of HPV-Related Oropharyngeal Cancer

F. De Felice | V. Tombolini | ... | A. Polimeni
Journal of Oncology
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate24%
Submission to final decision66 days
Acceptance to publication37 days
CiteScore1.400
Impact Factor2.206
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