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Journal of Obesity
Volume 2010, Article ID 831901, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/831901
Clinical Study

Long-Term Effects of Metformin and Lifestyle Modification on Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Obese Adolescents

1Post Graduate Program of Nutrition, Paulista Medicine School, Federal University of São Paulo, UNIFESP-EPM, 04020-060 São Paulo, Brazil
2Department of Biosciences, Paulista Medicine School, Federal University of São Paulo, UNIFESP-EPM, 04020-060 São Paulo, Brazil
3Imaging Diagnostic, Paulista Medicine School, Federal University of São Paulo, UNIFESP-EPM, 04020-060 São Paulo, Brazil
4Association Found of Incentive to Physicobiology, Paulista Medicine School, Federal University of São Paulo, UNIFESP-EPM, 04020-060 São Paulo, Brazil
5Department of Psychobiology, Paulista Medicine School, Federal University of São Paulo, UNIFESP-EPM, 04020-060 São Paulo, Brazil

Received 26 August 2009; Revised 2 December 2009; Accepted 15 December 2009

Academic Editor: Alfredo Halpern

Copyright © 2010 Lian Tock et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. To assess the long-term effects of metformin in combination with lifestyle intervention and its association between insulin levels and the degree of steatosis at ultrasonography (US) in obese adolescents. Methods. Thirty-five postpubertal obese boys were randomized into two groups: one receiving metformin in combination with a multidisciplinary lifestyle intervention versus a placebo group, which also received the same intervention. The visceral, subcutaneous fat and degree of steatosis were measured by ultrasonography. Fasting blood samples were collected to analyze glucose, insulin, insulin resistance, and aminotransferases. Repeated ANOVA measures were used to compare changes over time and between groups, and Spearman's correlations were used to identify an association between insulin and the degree of steatosis at US. Results. There was a positive correlation between the degree of steatosis at US with insulin concentrations and HOMA-IR. Long-term therapy plus metformin significantly reduced body weight, body mass index, insulin, HOMA-IR, and visceral fat. Conclusions. Metformin was more effective than the placebo in improving clinical parameters associated with obesity and steatosis.