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Journal of Obesity
Volume 2011, Article ID 436509, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/436509
Research Article

SALSA: SAving Lives Staying Active to Promote Physical Activity and Healthy Eating

1Texas Obesity Research Center, Health and Human Performance Department, University of Houston, 3855 Holman Street, Houston, TX 77204, USA
2Strictly Street Salsa Dance Company, 1915 Commonwealth Street, Houston, TX 77006-1841, USA
3Department of Health Disparities Research, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, 1400 Pressler Street, Unit 1440, Houston, TX 77030-3906, USA

Received 3 June 2010; Revised 22 October 2010; Accepted 29 November 2010

Academic Editor: Eric Doucet

Copyright © 2011 Rebecca E. Lee et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Physical inactivity, poor dietary habits, and obesity are vexing problems among minorities. SAving Lives, Staying Active (SALSA) was an 8-week randomized controlled crossover design, pilot study to promote regular physical activity (PA) and fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption as a means to preventing weight gain among women of color. Participants completed measures of demographics, PA, and dietary habits. Women ( 𝑁 = 5 0 ; 𝑀 = 4 2 years) who participated were overweight ( 𝑀 B M I = 2 9 . 7  kg/m2; 𝑀 b o d y f a t = 3 8 . 5 % ) and reported low levels of leisure time PA ( 𝑀 = 1 0 . 7 MET-min/wk) and FV consumption ( 𝑀 = 4 . 2 servings/day). All were randomized to a four-week (1) semiweekly Latin dance group or (2) internet-based dietary education group. All participants reported a significant increase in weekly leisure time PA from baseline ( 𝑀 = 1 0 . 7 MET-min/wk) to follow up ( 𝑀 = 3 4 . 0 MET-min/wk, 𝑃 < . 0 0 1 ), and FV consumption increased over time by group ( 𝑃 = . 0 2 ). Data suggest that Latin dance interventions to improve PA and web-based interventions to improve dietary habits show promise for improving health among women of color.