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Journal of Obesity
Volume 2012, Article ID 269320, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/269320
Research Article

Situational Motivation and Perceived Intensity: Their Interaction in Predicting Changes in Positive Affect from Physical Activity

School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, 125 University Private Montpetit Hall, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1N 6N5

Received 8 December 2011; Revised 20 April 2012; Accepted 28 April 2012

Academic Editor: Pedro J. Teixeira

Copyright © 2012 Eva Guérin and Michelle S. Fortier. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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