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Journal of Obesity
Volume 2014, Article ID 784594, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/784594
Research Article

Hostility Modifies the Association between TV Viewing and Cardiometabolic Risk

1Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, Epidemiology Data Coordinating Center, University of Pittsburgh, 130 DeSoto Street, 127 Parran Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
2Department of Psychology in Education, School of Education, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
3Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55454, USA
4Departments of Psychiatry and Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
5Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA, USA

Received 26 February 2014; Revised 5 May 2014; Accepted 6 May 2014; Published 23 June 2014

Academic Editor: Maria Luz Fernandez

Copyright © 2014 Anthony Fabio et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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