Journal of Obesity

Self-Regulation, Motivation, and Psychosocial Factors in Weight Management


Publishing date
04 May 2012
Status
Published
Submission deadline
04 Nov 2011

1Department of Sports and Health, Faculty of Human Kinetics, Technical University of Lisbon, 1495-688 Cruz Quebrada, Portugal

2Department of Psychology, University of Connecticut, CT 06269, USA

3Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Laval University, QC, Canada G1V 0A6

4Department of Psychology, University of Basel, 4003 Basel, Switzerland

5Departments of Medicine and Clinical and Social Sciences in Psychology, Center for Community Health, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627, USA


Self-Regulation, Motivation, and Psychosocial Factors in Weight Management

Description

In most environments and physiological conditions, behaviors related to body weight regulation are within the reach of voluntary control and regulation. Variables associated with the volitional regulation of those behaviors such as psychosocial and other factors that may affect motivation, can be identified and manipulated to advance the understanding of etiology, prevention, and reversal of overweight/obesity, particularly at the level of the individual. The motivational underpinnings of automatic routines or habits with low level of conscious regulation can also be explored with implications for behavior change. Obesity research can clearly benefit from a more in-depth understanding of these variables, which can potentially be translated into clinical and even public health interventions.

We invite original contributions pertaining to motivational and self-regulatory psychosocial factors in obesity, in the form of empirical research, review and methodological papers, or commentaries, that advance current and future research and practice. We are particularly interested in research focused on long-term weight loss maintenance. Studies may explore the dimensions of cognition, executive function, behavioral skills/plans, perceptions and attributions, mood and affect, psychological needs, personality factors, quality of life, social/clinical climate, perceived norms and bias, habit formation, and other aspects. Studies may employ explicit as well as implicit measures and may also focus on behavioral techniques per se, especially if the associated psychological processes are also explored. All contributions for this special issue must be directly relevant to human weight control. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Motivational and self-regulatory consequences of incentives, environmental changes or “nudges,” social comparison, bias and discrimination, or body image
  • The role of individual motivation in weight control (e.g., quantity versus quality or motivation, weight loss motives, life aspirations, etc.)
  • Daily fluctuations in motivation/self-regulation or in psychological states related to eating or activity/inactivity behaviors
  • Approaches with an explicit reduced focus on actual body weight change (e.g., “health at every size” programs)
  • Translational research focused on promoting self-regulation of body weight
  • Self-regulation of discrete sedentary, activity, and dietary behaviors/patterns (e.g. breakfast, sitting time)
  • Impact of obese persons' own perceptions regarding obesity and weight control

Before submission authors should carefully read over the journal's Author Guidelines, which are located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/jobes/guidelines/. Prospective authors should submit an electronic copy of their complete manuscript through the journal Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/ according to the following timetable:


Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 582348
  • - Editorial

Self-Regulation, Motivation, and Psychosocial Factors in Weight Management

Pedro J. Teixeira | Jutta Mata | ... | Simone Lemieux
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 298067
  • - Research Article

Parents’ Readiness to Change Affects BMI Reduction Outcomes in Adolescents with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Karen P. Jakubowski | Jessica J. Black | ... | Dana L. Rofey
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 846401
  • - Research Article

Eating and Psychological Profiles of Women with Higher Depressive Symptoms Who Are Trying to Lose Weight

C. Bégin | S. De Grandpré | M.-P. Gagnon-Girouard
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 710427
  • - Review Article

Applying a Common-Sense Approach to Fighting Obesity

Jessica Y. Breland | Ashley M. Fox | ... | Howard Leventhal
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 274068
  • - Research Article

Psychobehavioural Factors Are More Strongly Associated with Successful Weight Management Than Predetermined Satiety Effect or Other Characteristics of Diet

Leila Karhunen | Marika Lyly | ... | Kaisa Poutanen
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 546459
  • - Review Article

Physical Activity Behaviour: An Overview of Current and Emergent Theoretical Practices

Duncan S. Buchan | Stewart Ollis | ... | Julien S. Baker
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 269320
  • - Research Article

Situational Motivation and Perceived Intensity: Their Interaction in Predicting Changes in Positive Affect from Physical Activity

Eva Guérin | Michelle S. Fortier
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 803769
  • - Research Article

Weight Gain Prevention for College Freshmen: Comparing Two Social Cognitive Theory-Based Interventions with and without Explicit Self-Regulation Training

Elizabeth A. Dennis | Kerry L. Potter | ... | Brenda M. Davy
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 354721
  • - Research Article

Physical Activity Advertisements That Feature Daily Well-Being Improve Autonomy and Body Image in Overweight Women but Not Men

Michelle L. Segar | John A. Updegraff | ... | Caroline R. Richardson
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 205393
  • - Research Article

Weight Misperceptions and Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Adolescent Female Body Mass Index

Ramona C. Krauss | Lisa M. Powell | Roy Wada
Journal of Obesity
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate28%
Submission to final decision92 days
Acceptance to publication46 days
CiteScore2.560
Impact Factor-
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