Journal of Obesity

Sedentary Behaviors, Weight, and Health and Disease Risks


Publishing date
01 Nov 2011
Status
Published
Submission deadline
01 May 2011

Lead Editor

1Department of Nutrition, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA

2Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Brown Medical School, Providence, RI, USA

3Department of Kinesiology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA

4Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA


Sedentary Behaviors, Weight, and Health and Disease Risks

Description

Sedentary behaviors have been associated with weight status and health and disease risks in children and adults. Previously, sedentary behaviors have been defined as screen-related behaviors (i.e., television watching and computer use) performed during leisure time. Recently, the definition of sedentary behaviors has broadened to include breaks from activity and behaviors that do not substantially increase energy expenditure above that which occurs at rest (i.e., sitting). The mechanisms by which sedentary behaviors, specifically different types and doses of sedentary behaviors, impact weight and health and disease risks have not been well defined. The best methods to reduce sedentary behaviors, especially in adults, are not known, and the impact of reducing sedentary behaviors on weight and health and disease risks is not clear in many populations. Finally, when the time spent in sedentary behaviors is reduced, choices that are made with the reallocation of that newly found free time are unknown (i.e., are sedentary behaviors exchanged for other behaviors that have a higher energy expenditure?).

We are interested in papers that explore the many unresolved issues pertaining to sedentary behaviors, weight, and health and disease risks in children and adults. We invite investigators to contribute original research as well as review articles that will further broaden the understanding of the relationship between sedentary behaviors and weight and health. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Developing methods for measuring sedentary behaviors
  • Examining relationships between the broader definitions of sedentary behaviors and weight and health
  • Investigating physiological pathways mediating how sedentary behaviors affect health
  • Examining relationships between sedentary behaviors and other behaviors related to energy balance
  • Identifying factors about television viewing, and potentially other sedentary behaviors, that influence food consumption
  • Testing methods to reduce sedentary behaviors
  • Intervening on sedentary behaviors and the impact on weight and health and disease risks

Before submission authors should carefully read over the journal's Author Guidelines, which are located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/jobes/guidelines/. Prospective authors should submit an electronic copy of their complete manuscript through the journal Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/ according to the following timetable:


Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 852743
  • - Editorial

Sedentary Behaviors, Weight, and Health and Disease Risks

Hollie A. Raynor | Dale S. Bond | ... | Susan B. Sisson
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 752820
  • - Research Article

Television Viewing Does Not Have to Be Sedentary: Motivation to Participate in a TV Exercise Program

Jessie J. M. Meis | Stef P. J. Kremers | Martine P. A. Bouman
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 607908
  • - Research Article

Sitting Behaviors and Mental Health among Workers and Nonworkers: The Role of Weight Status

Karin I. Proper | H. Susan J. Picavet | ... | G. C. Wanda Wendel-Vos
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 282303
  • - Research Article

The Feasibility of Reducing and Measuring Sedentary Time among Overweight, Non-Exercising Office Workers

Sarah Kozey-Keadle | Amanda Libertine | ... | Patty Freedson
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 460271
  • - Research Article

Accuracy of Intensity and Inclinometer Output of Three Activity Monitors for Identification of Sedentary Behavior and Light-Intensity Activity

Lucas J. Carr | Matthew T. Mahar
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 685430
  • - Review Article

Intervening to Reduce Sedentary Behaviors and Childhood Obesity among School-Age Youth: A Systematic Review of Randomized Trials

May May Leung | Alen Agaronov | ... | Ming-Chin Yeh
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 852147
  • - Research Article

Do Motion Controllers Make Action Video Games Less Sedentary? A Randomized Experiment

Elizabeth J. Lyons | Deborah F. Tate | ... | Sriram Kalyanaraman
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 183194
  • - Research Article

Beyond Screen Time: Assessing Recreational Sedentary Behavior among Adolescent Girls

Katherine W. Bauer | Sarah Friend | ... | Dianne Neumark-Sztainer
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 735465
  • - Research Article

Unraveling the Relationship between Smoking and Weight: The Role of Sedentary Behavior

Annette Kaufman | Erik M. Augustson | Heather Patrick
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 379215
  • - Review Article

A Review of Different Behavior Modification Strategies Designed to Reduce Sedentary Screen Behaviors in Children

Jeremy A. Steeves | Dixie L. Thompson | ... | Hollie A. Raynor
Journal of Obesity
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate35%
Submission to final decision65 days
Acceptance to publication32 days
CiteScore3.600
Impact Factor-
 Submit

We are committed to sharing findings related to COVID-19 as quickly and safely as possible. Any author submitting a COVID-19 paper should notify us at help@hindawi.com to ensure their research is fast-tracked and made available on a preprint server as soon as possible. We will be providing unlimited waivers of publication charges for accepted articles related to COVID-19. Sign up here as a reviewer to help fast-track new submissions.