Journal of Nursing Management
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Acceptance rate9%
Submission to final decision120 days
Acceptance to publication14 days
CiteScore6.800
Journal Citation Indicator1.690
Impact Factor5.5

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Journal of Nursing Management is an international forum which informs and advances the discipline of nursing management and leadership. 

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Journal of Nursing Management is an international forum which informs and advances the discipline of nursing management and leadership. 

 Special Issues

We currently have a number of Special Issues open for submission. Special Issues highlight emerging areas of research within a field, or provide a venue for a deeper investigation into an existing research area.

Latest Articles

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Research Article

Frontline Nurses’ Job Satisfaction and Missed Nursing Care in a COVID-19 Dedicated Hospital in China: A Cross-Sectional Study

This study examined the current situation and relationship between missed nursing care (MNC) and job satisfaction among frontline nurses in a hospital dedicated to treating COVID-19 patients in China. Many dedicated hospitals were constructed or refurbished to centrally manage patients with COVID-19. Most nurses and doctors in these hospitals were redeployed from other departments or hospitals. This may have compromised nursing quality and job satisfaction. The omission of nursing care is a critical factor in assessing nursing quality; therefore, focusing on both MNC and job satisfaction is essential. This cross-sectional study used convenience and snowball sampling techniques to recruit frontline nurses working in a hospital for treating COVID-19 patients from November to December 2022. The questionnaires used in this study included sociodemographic information, job satisfaction, and the MISSCARE survey. Differences in job satisfaction and MISSCARE scores among participants’ demographic deviations were explored using the Mann–Whitney Z test (two groups) and the Kruskal–Wallis H test (three or more groups). The correlation between participants’ job satisfaction and missed nursing actions was analysed using Spearman’s correlation analysis. The analysis included 306 frontline nurses. Frontline nurses’ job satisfaction was high, and their MNC was low. The highest MNC was “offer rehabilitation care and guidance to patients in need every day.” The most reported reasons for the MNC were “urgent patient situations.” In addition, the job satisfaction scale, MNC scores, and reasons for MNC scores showed statistically significant differences among participants’ demographic variables. Moreover, this study identified a negative correlation between frontline nurses’ job satisfaction and MNC. Frontline nurses’ job satisfaction was high, and their MNC was low. Frontline nurses’ demographics were shown to affect their job satisfaction, MNC, and reported reasons. Furthermore, participants’ job satisfaction can influence the MNC. Tailored interventions aimed at maintaining low levels of MNC should consider frontline nurses’ demographic characteristics and job satisfaction.

Research Article

Toxic Leadership in Emergency Nurses: Assessing Abusive Supervision and Its Team-Level Impacts on Conflict Management and Organizational Commitment

Background. Emergency departments suffer from authoritarian and manipulative leadership styles that affect team dynamics, emotional exhaustion, and quality patient care. However, little research specifically explores these toxic leadership effects on conflict management and nurses' organizational commitment. Objectives. This cross-sectional study aimed to assess the correlations between perceived toxic leadership, conflict resolution strategies, and commitment dimensions among emergency nurses while evaluating conflict tendencies as a mediating mechanism. Methods. A cross-sectional design that included multiple regression and mediation analyses was utilized. The sample consisted of 387 emergency nurses from five major Saudi hospitals surveyed using validated scales that measure perceived toxic leadership, conflict styles, and organizational commitment. Results. High prevalence rates for perceived authoritarian (77%), narcissistic (75%), and unpredictable (63%) leadership were reported. Increased toxicity was positively related to dominating and avoiding conflict styles but negatively related to integrating and compromising strategies. Toxic leadership is also associated with lower affective/normative commitment but higher continuance commitment. Conflict management partially mediated the leadership-commitment relationship, which explained 29% of the total effect. Finally, higher experience and education predicted greater perceived toxicity. Conclusions. The significant correlations between destructive leadership, adverse conflict, and reduced commitment in emergency nurses underscore the need for context-specific leadership training. Fostering supportive environments through multifaceted interventions can counteract toxicity impacts, impart constructive communication techniques, improve nurse well-being, and ensure high-quality patient care. As conflict tendencies and nurse characteristics influence susceptibility to detrimental leadership, tailored programs addressing experience levels are vital.

Research Article

The Impact of Grit on Nurses’ Job Performance: Evaluating Chained Mediation through Perceived Social Support and Self-Esteem

Background. Nurses play a critical role in the medical workforce during the COVID-19 pandemic while facing various difficulties and challenges. Grit, social support, and self-esteem are important psychosocial factors influencing job performance. However, few studies have explored the relationships among these factors in nurses. Aim. This study aimed to examine the association between grit and nurses’ job performance during the COVID-19 pandemic and to explore the potential chain mediation through perceived social support and self-esteem. Methods. A cross-sectional survey design was employed. From January 2021 to May 2022, a total of 709 Chinese nurses in Chengdu and Kunming completed a web-based cross-sectional survey, which included standard assessments on grit, perceived social support, self-esteem, and job performance as well as Big Five personalities. The chain mediation model was tested using the PROCESS macro program in the SPSS software. Results. There was a moderate-to-large correlation (r = 0.40, ) between grit and job performance in Chinese nurses. Furthermore, grit was indirectly linked to job performance through the chain mediating effect of perceived social support and self-esteem (all ). These findings persisted even when Big Five personalities were included as additional controlling variables. Conclusions. This study reveals a stable link between grit and job performance among Chinese nurses and highlights the potential role of perceived social support and self-esteem in mediating this link. Implications for Nursing Management. Nursing managers can improve nurses’ grit level and provide a supportive organizational environment conducive to enhancing self-esteem and thereby promoting their job performance.

Review Article

Trust in the Leader and Trust in the Organization in Healthcare: A Concept Analysis Based on a Systematic Review

Orientation. Trust is the central part of leadership and organizational culture and can often go unnoticed until it decreases. There is a lack of a comprehensive concept analysis of trust in the healthcare setting. Research Purpose. The research aim was to gather, assess, and synthesize previous empirical evidence from the field of healthcare about the concepts of trust in the leader and trust in the organization. Motivation for the Study. To create a comprehensive and generic concept analysis of trust in the leader and organization for the healthcare sector based on recent empirical studies. Research Design and Method. A concept analysis, which followed the method presented by Walker and Avant, was conducted as a systematic review that adhered to the PRISMA guidelines. A total of eight databases were searched for relevant literature and 42 articles were included. Main Findings. The definitions of trust in the leader and the organization were based on emotion and cognition. Trust in the leader emerged as a core feature of collaborative leader-employee relationships, whereas trust in the organization was a key construct of organizational functioning. Trust in the leader and the organization contributed to commitment, increased work production, enhanced collaboration, and improved workplace well-being. Defense mechanisms were identified as a new contrary concept, while justice was found to be a related concept. Contribution. Both trust in the leader and trust in the organization positively impact an organization, nurse leaders, and employees. Deeper knowledge of trust and its attributes will be critical to the operationalization and estimation of levels of trust in healthcare organizations. Managerial Implications. Trust in the leader and the organization can significantly influence the attractiveness of an organization, retention of personnel, productivity, and work-related well-being. Thus, this aspect should be measured and developed systematically while acknowledging the antecedents of trust building.

Research Article

The Coping Strategies and Cumulative Changes in Intensive Care Unit Nurses after Experiencing Professional Grief: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Study

Background. Compared to nurses in other hospital departments, intensive care unit (ICU) nurses have more frequent exposure to patient deaths, potentially rendering them more susceptible to experiencing professional grief following patient fatalities. Objective. To explore the coping experiences of ICU nurses following their encounter with professional grief. Methods. This study utilized a qualitative research design based on Heideggerian phenomenology. A purposive sample of 18 ICU nurses was selected from six tertiary hospitals in Guangdong Province, China. Individual semistructured interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The transcribed texts were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Results. Two main themes emerged: (1) short-term dual coping with professional grief and (2) long-term cumulative changes from professional grief. These themes reflect the dynamic coping processes experienced by ICU nurses amidst frequent encounters with loss and grief during their clinical work. Conclusions. ICU nurses employ both adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies to address professional grief, significantly impacting their personal and professional well-being. It is advisable to offer targeted education and organizational support systems for ICU nurses to promote positive cumulative growth when they repeatedly encounter patient deaths.

Research Article

The Influence of Authentic Leadership Perception on Clinical Nurses’ Voice Behaviour and the Mediating Effect of Conscientiousness

Aims and Objectives. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of authentic leadership and conscientiousness on the voice behaviour exhibited by nurses. Background. Clinical nurses, being integral members of the medical system and actively engaged with patients and their families, possess significant influence in addressing various work-related issues and contribute significantly to the advancement of clinical services and the overall stability of hospitals within the nursing team. Consequently, it is imperative to prioritize the consideration of nurses’ recommendations in order to identify the factors that can effectively enhance their enthusiasm in vocalizing their concerns. Design. Data in this cross-sectional descriptive study were collected from March 2021 to August 2021 by the online survey method. Methods. A total of 679 Chinese nurses were surveyed with a Chinese Big Five Personality Inventory Brief Scale, an Authentic Leadership Scale, and a Voice Behaviour Scale. Because the data were normally distributed in our study, Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r) was used to conduct the correlation analysis of the study variables. The structural equation model was used to examine the mediating role of conscientiousness. Results. The results showed that the influencing factors of nurses’ voice behavior were education background, employment mode, nursing seniority, and monthly income (). In addition, authentic leadership, conscientiousness, and voice behaviour were significantly positively correlated (the correlation coefficients are 0.632 and 0.630, respectively, ). Conscientiousness plays a partial mediating role in authentic leadership. Conclusion. Authentic leadership was the key to improving the voice behaviour of nurses; as a mediating mechanism, conscientiousness further explained how authentic leadership promoted the voice behaviour of nurses. The effects of authentic leadership, conscientiousness, and voice behaviour could be used to guide the management of clinical nurses. In particular, the authentic leadership style perceived by nurses and the conscientiousness of nurses would contribute to the generation of voice behaviour.

Journal of Nursing Management
Publishing Collaboration
More info
Wiley Hindawi logo
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate9%
Submission to final decision120 days
Acceptance to publication14 days
CiteScore6.800
Journal Citation Indicator1.690
Impact Factor5.5
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