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Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 906943, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/906943
Review Article

The Domestic Cat as a Large Animal Model for Characterization of Disease and Therapeutic Intervention in Hereditary Retinal Blindness

1Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mason Eye Institute, University of Missouri-Columbia, MO 65211, USA
2Department of Ophthalmology, Mason Eye Institute, University of Missouri-Columbia, MO 65212-0001, USA
3Department of Chemistry, Gettysburg College, Gettysburg, PA 17325, USA
4Laboratory of Genomic Diversity, National Cancer Institute-Frederick, Frederick, MD 21702-1201, USA

Received 19 July 2010; Revised 4 October 2010; Accepted 24 January 2011

Academic Editor: Radha Ayyagari

Copyright © 2011 Kristina Narfström et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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