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Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume 2012, Article ID 196418, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/196418
Review Article

Could Mineralocorticoids Play a Role in the Pathophysiology of Open Angle Glaucoma?

Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine Carl Gustav Carus, TU Dresden, 01307 Dresden, Germany

Received 6 May 2011; Accepted 2 July 2011

Academic Editor: Antonio L. Ferreras

Copyright © 2012 Christian Albrecht May. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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