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Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume 2012, Article ID 483034, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/483034
Review Article

Development of Anti-VEGF Therapies for Intraocular Use: A Guide for Clinicians

1NIHR Biomedical Research Centre for Ophthalmology, Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London EC1V 2PD, UK
2Doheny Eye Institute and Department of Ophthalmology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA

Received 8 September 2011; Accepted 1 November 2011

Academic Editor: Toshiaki Kubota

Copyright © 2012 Pearse A. Keane and Srinivas R. Sadda. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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