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Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 956705, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/956705
Research Article

Refractive Development in the “ROP Rat”

1Department of Ophthalmology, Children's Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Fegan 4, Boston, MA 02115, USA
2Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA
3Department of Ophthalmology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA

Received 6 September 2011; Accepted 8 October 2011

Academic Editor: Shintaro Nakao

Copyright © 2012 Toco Y. P. Chui et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Although retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is clinically characterized by abnormal retinal vessels at the posterior pole of the eye, it is also commonly characterized by vascular abnormalities in the anterior segment, visual dysfunction which is based in retinal dysfunction, and, most commonly of all, arrested eye growth and high refractive error, particularly (and paradoxically) myopia. The oxygen-induced retinopathy rat model of ROP presents neurovascular outcomes similar to the human disease, although it is not yet known if the “ROP rat” also models the small-eyed myopia characteristic of ROP. In this study, magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of albino (Sprague-Dawley) and pigmented (Long-Evans) ROP rat eyes, and age- and strain-matched room-air-reared (RAR) controls, were examined. The positions and curvatures of the various optical media were measured and the refractive state (℞) of each eye estimated based on a previously published model. Even in adulthood (postnatal day 50), Sprague-Dawley and Long-Evans ROP rats were significantly myopic compared to strain-matched controls. The myopia in the Long-Evans ROP rats was more severe than in the Sprague-Dawley ROP rats, which also had significantly shorter axial lengths. These data reveal the ROP rat to be a novel and potentially informative approach to investigating physiological mechanisms in myopia in general and the myopia peculiar to ROP in particular.