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Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume 2013, Article ID 925267, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/925267
Review Article

Vascular Adhesion Protein 1 in the Eye

1Department of Ophthalmology, 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 246 Xuefu Road, Harbin 150001, China
2Harbin Medical University-The Key Laboratory of Myocardial Ischemia, Chinese Ministry of Education, Harbin 150001, China
3Department of Ophthalmology, 1st Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150001, China

Received 17 January 2013; Revised 17 April 2013; Accepted 14 May 2013

Academic Editor: Nan Hu

Copyright © 2013 Wenting Luo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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