Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume 2014, Article ID 585792, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/585792
Research Article

Salient Distractors Can Induce Saccade Adaptation

1Department of Biology, City College of New York, Marshak Science Building, Room 526, New York, NY 10031, USA
2School of Psychology, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia

Received 7 December 2013; Revised 5 February 2014; Accepted 11 February 2014; Published 30 April 2014

Academic Editor: Arvid Herwig

Copyright © 2014 Afsheen Khan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. W. Becker, “Metrics,” in The Neurobiology of Saccadic Eye Movements, Wurtz and Goldberg, Eds., pp. 13–67, Elsevier Science, 1989. View at Google Scholar
  2. G. Kommerell, D. Olivier, and H. Theopold, “Adaptive programming of phasic and tonic components in saccadic eye movements. Investigations in patients with abducens palsy,” Investigative Ophthalmology, vol. 15, no. 8, pp. 657–660, 1976. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. L. A. Abel, D. Schmidt, L. F. Dell'Osso, and R. B. Daroff, “Saccadic system plasticity in humans,” Annals of Neurology, vol. 4, no. 4, pp. 313–318, 1978. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. L. M. Optican and D. A. Robinson, “Cerebellar-dependent adaptive control of primate saccadic system,” Journal of Neurophysiology, vol. 44, no. 6, pp. 1058–1076, 1980. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. R. Snow, J. Hore, and T. Vilis, “Adaptation of saccadic and vestibulo-ocular systems after extraocular muscle tenectomy,” Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, vol. 26, no. 7, pp. 924–931, 1985. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. S. C. McLaughlin, “Parametric adjustment in saccadic eye movements,” Percept Psychophys, vol. 2, no. 8, pp. 359–362, 1967. View at Google Scholar
  7. J. E. Albano and W. M. King, “Rapid adaptation of saccadic amplitude in humans and monkeys,” Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, vol. 30, no. 8, pp. 1883–1893, 1989. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. J. Wallman and A. F. Fuchs, “Saccadic gain modification: visual error drives motor adaptation,” Journal of Neurophysiology, vol. 80, no. 5, pp. 2405–2416, 1998. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. D. O. Bahcall and E. Kowler, “The control of saccadic adaptation: implications for the scanning of natural visual scenes,” Vision Research, vol. 40, no. 20, pp. 2779–2796, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. C. T. Noto and F. R. Robinson, “Visual error is the stimulus for saccade gain adaptation,” Cognitive Brain Research, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 301–305, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. K. Havermann and M. Lappe, “The influence of the consistency of postsaccadic visual errors on saccadic adaptation,” Journal of Neurophysiology, vol. 103, no. 6, pp. 3302–3310, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. J. J. Hopp and A. F. Fuchs, “The characteristics and neuronal substrate of saccadic eye movement plasticity,” Progress in Neurobiology, vol. 72, no. 1, pp. 27–53, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. T. Collins and J. Wallman, “The relative importance of retinal error and prediction in saccadic adaptation,” Journal of Neurophysiology, vol. 107, no. 12, pp. 3342–3348, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  14. H. Chen-Harris, W. M. Joiner, V. Ethier, D. S. Zee, and R. Shadmehr, “Adaptive control of saccades via internal feedback,” Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 28, no. 11, pp. 2804–2813, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. M. R. Harwood and J. P. Herman, “Optimally straight and optimally curved saccades,” Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 28, no. 30, pp. 7455–7457, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. J. P. Herman, A. Blangero, L. Madelain, A. Khan, and M. R. Harwood, “Saccade adaptation as a model of flexible and general motor learning,” Experimental Eye Research, vol. 114, pp. 6–15, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  17. M. I. Posner, “Orienting of attention,” The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 3–25, 1980. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. M. Rolfs, D. Jonikaitis, H. Deubel, and P. Cavanagh, “Predictive remapping of attention across eye movements,” Nature Neuroscience, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 252–258, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. J. D. Golomb, M. M. Chun, and J. A. Mazer, “The native coordinate system of spatial attention is retinotopic,” Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 28, no. 42, pp. 10654–10662, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. P. Cavanagh, A. R. Hunt, A. Afraz, and M. Rolfs, “Visual stability based on remapping of attention pointers,” Trends in Cognitive Sciences, vol. 14, no. 4, pp. 147–153, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. T. Collins, M. Rolfs, H. Deubel, and P. Cavanagh, “Post-saccadic location judgments reveal remapping of saccade targets to non-foveal locations,” Journal of Vision, vol. 9, no. 5, pp. 1–9, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. S. A. McFadden and J. Wallman, “Shifts of attention and saccades are very similar. Are they causally linked?” in Vision and Attention, M. Jenkin and L. Harris, Eds., pp. 19–39, Springer, New York, NY, USA, 2001. View at Google Scholar
  23. S. A. McFadden, A. Khan, and J. Wallman, “Gain adaptation of exogenous shifts of visual attention,” Vision Research, vol. 42, no. 24, pp. 2709–2726, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. E. Castet, S. Jeanjean, A. Montagnini, D. Laugier, and G. S. Masson, “Dynamics of attentional deployment during saccadic programming,” Journal of Vision, vol. 6, no. 3, article 2, pp. 196–212, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. H. Deubel and W. X. Schneider, “Saccade target selection and object recognition: evidence for a common attentional mechanism,” Vision Research, vol. 36, no. 12, pp. 1827–1837, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. J. E. Hoffman and B. Subramaniam, “The role of visual attention in saccadic eye movements,” Perception and Psychophysics, vol. 57, no. 6, pp. 787–795, 1995. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. E. Kowler, E. Anderson, B. Dosher, and E. Blaser, “The role of attention in the programming of saccades,” Vision Research, vol. 35, no. 13, pp. 1897–1916, 1995. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. R. Desimone and J. Duncan, “Neural mechanisms of selective visual attention,” Annual Review of Neuroscience, vol. 18, pp. 193–222, 1995. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. J. D. Golomb, A. C. Marino, M. M. Chun, and J. A. Mazer, “Attention doesn't slide: spatiotopic updating after eye movements instantiates a new, discrete attentional locus,” Attention, Perception, and Psychophysics, vol. 73, no. 1, pp. 7–14, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. T. Koelewijn, A. Bronkhorst, and J. Theeuwes, “Auditory and visual capture during focused visual attention,” Journal of Experimental Psychology, vol. 35, no. 5, pp. 1303–1315, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. E. McSorley, P. Haggard, and R. Walker, “Time course of oculomotor inhibition revealed by saccade trajectory modulation,” Journal of Neurophysiology, vol. 96, no. 3, pp. 1420–1424, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. J. L. Shafer, C. T. Noto, and A. F. Fuchs, “Temporal characteristics of error signals driving saccadic gain adaptation in the macaque monkey,” Journal of Neurophysiology, vol. 84, no. 1, pp. 88–95, 2000. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. M. Fujita, A. Amagai, F. Minakawa, and M. Aoki, “Selective and delay adaptation of human saccades,” Cognitive Brain Research, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 41–52, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. M. Panouillères, C. Urquizar, R. Salemme, and D. Pélisson, “Sensory processing of motor inaccuracy depends on previously performed movement and on subsequent motor corrections: a study of the saccadic system,” PLoS ONE, vol. 6, no. 2, Article ID e17329, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. J. Ditterich, T. Eggert, and A. Straube, “The role of the attention focus in the visual information processing underlying saccadic adaptation,” Vision Research, vol. 40, no. 9, pp. 1125–1134, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. L. Madelain, M. R. Harwood, J. P. Herman, and J. Wallman, “Saccade adaptation is unhampered by distractors,” Journal of vision, vol. 10, no. 12, p. 29, 2010. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. K. Grill-Spector, R. Henson, and A. Martin, “Repetition and the brain: neural models of stimulus-specific effects,” Trends in Cognitive Sciences, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 14–23, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. F. R. Robinson, C. T. Noto, and S. E. Bevans, “Effect of visual error size on saccade adaptation in monkey,” Journal of Neurophysiology, vol. 90, no. 2, pp. 1235–1244, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. D. Pélisson, N. Alahyane, M. Panouillères, and C. Tilikete, “Sensorimotor adaptation of saccadic eye movements,” Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, vol. 34, no. 8, pp. 1103–1120, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. A. L. Wong and M. Shelhamer, “Sensorimotor adaptation error signals are derived from realistic predictions of movement outcomes,” Journal of Neurophysiology, vol. 105, no. 3, pp. 1130–1140, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. J. P. Herman, C. P. Cloud, and J. Wallman, “End-point variability is not noise in saccade adaptation,” PLoS ONE, vol. 8, no. 3, Article ID e59731, 2013. View at Google Scholar
  42. L. Madelain, C. Paeye, and J. Wallman, “Modification of saccadic gain by reinforcement,” Journal of Neurophysiology, vol. 106, no. 1, pp. 219–232, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. L. Madelain, J. P. Herman, and M. R. Harwood, “Saccade adaptation goes for the goal,” Journal of Vision, vol. 13, no. 4, 2013. View at Google Scholar
  44. F. Robinson, C. Noto, and S. Watanabe, “Effect of visual background on saccade adaptation in monkeys,” Vision Research, vol. 40, no. 17, pp. 2359–2367, 2000. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  45. H. Deubel, “Is saccadic adaptation context-specific?” in Eye Movement Research: Mechanisms, Processes and Applications, J. M. Findlay, R. W. Kentridge, and R. Walker, Eds., Elsevier Science, 1995. View at Google Scholar
  46. E. Awh, K. M. Armstrong, and T. Moore, “Visual and oculomotor selection: links, causes and implications for spatial attention,” Trends in Cognitive Sciences, vol. 10, no. 3, pp. 124–130, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  47. C.-H. Juan, S. M. Shorter-Jacobi, and J. D. Schall, “Dissociation of spatial attention and saccade preparation,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 101, no. 43, pp. 15541–15544, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  48. A. V. Belopolsky and J. Theeuwes, “When are attention and saccade preparation dissociated?” Psychological Science, vol. 20, no. 11, pp. 1340–1347, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  49. A. V. Belopolsky and J. Theeuwes, “No capture outside the attentional window,” Vision Research, vol. 50, no. 23, pp. 2543–2550, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  50. H. J. Müller, T. Geyer, M. Zehetleitner, and J. Krummenacher, “Attentional capture by salient color singleton distractors is modulated by top-down dimensional set,” Journal of Experimental Psychology, vol. 35, no. 1, pp. 1–16, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  51. J. M. Findlay and I. D. Gilchrist, “Spatial scale and saccade programming,” Perception, vol. 26, no. 9, pp. 1159–1167, 1997. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  52. J. M. Miller, T. Anstis, and W. B. Templeton, “Saccadic plasticity: parametric adaptive control by retinal feedback,” Journal of Experimental Psychology, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 356–366, 1981. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  53. J. L. Semmlow, G. M. Gauthier, and J.-L. Vercher, “Mechanisms of short-term saccadic adaptation,” Journal of Experimental Psychology, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 249–258, 1989. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  54. J. Tian and D. S. Zee, “Context-specific saccadic adaptation in monkeys,” Vision Research, vol. 50, no. 23, pp. 2403–2410, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  55. Y. Kaku, K. Yoshida, and Y. Iwamoto, “Learning signals from the superior colliculus for adaptation of saccadic eye movements in the monkey,” Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 29, no. 16, pp. 5266–5275, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  56. R. Soetedjo, A. F. Fuchs, and Y. Kojima, “Subthreshold activation of the superior colliculus drives saccade motor learning,” Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 29, no. 48, pp. 15213–15222, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  57. J. Cavanaugh and R. H. Wurtz, “Subcortical modulation of attention counters change blindness,” Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 24, no. 50, pp. 11236–11243, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  58. J. R. Müller, M. G. Philiastides, and W. T. Newsome, “Microstimulation of the superior colliculus focuses attention without moving the eyes,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 102, no. 3, pp. 524–529, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus