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Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume 2014, Article ID 585921, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/585921
Research Article

Attentional Capture and Inhibition of Saccades after Irrelevant and Relevant Cues

1Faculty of Psychology, University of Vienna, Liebiggasse 5, 1010 Wien, Austria
2MR Centre of Excellence, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Wien, Austria
3Study Group Clinical fMRI, Department of Neurology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Wien, Austria
4Laboratoire Psychologie de la Perception, Université Paris Descartes, 75006 Paris, France
5Institute of Cognitive Science, University of Osnabrück, 49069 Osnabrück, Germany

Received 17 January 2014; Accepted 20 February 2014; Published 22 April 2014

Academic Editor: Gernot Horstmann

Copyright © 2014 Heinz-Werner Priess et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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