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Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume 2014, Article ID 789120, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/789120
Review Article

Epigenetic Modifications and Potential New Treatment Targets in Diabetic Retinopathy

1EA 7281 R2D2, Medical School, Auvergne University, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France
2Department of Biomedicine, University of Aarhus, 8200 Aarhus, Denmark
3Departments of Anatomy/Cell Biology and Ophthalmology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA

Received 8 April 2014; Revised 22 June 2014; Accepted 17 July 2014; Published 3 August 2014

Academic Editor: Lawrence S. Morse

Copyright © 2014 Lorena Perrone et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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