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Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume 2015, Article ID 454096, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/454096
Research Article

Sentinel Events in Ophthalmology: Experience from Hong Kong

1Department of Ophthalmology, United Christian Hospital, 130 Hip Wo Street, Kwun Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
2Quality and Safety Office, United Christian Hospital, 130 Hip Wo Street, Kwun Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong

Received 26 January 2015; Revised 23 February 2015; Accepted 23 February 2015

Academic Editor: Tamer A. Macky

Copyright © 2015 Shiu Ting Mak. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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