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Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume 2016, Article ID 5801826, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5801826
Research Article

Retinal Electrophysiology Is a Viable Preclinical Biomarker for Drug Penetrance into the Central Nervous System

1Department of Optometry & Vision Sciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
2Pfizer Neusentis, Cambridge CB21 6GS, UK

Received 16 February 2016; Revised 10 March 2016; Accepted 16 March 2016

Academic Editor: Ciro Costagliola

Copyright © 2016 Jason Charng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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