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Journal of Osteoporosis
Volume 2011, Article ID 710387, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/710387
Research Article

A Randomized Controlled Trial of Whole Body Vibration Exposure on Markers of Bone Turnover in Postmenopausal Women

1Exercise, Health and Performance Faculty Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, NSW 1825, Australia
2School of Exercise Science, Australian Catholic University, Strathfield, NSW 2135, Australia
3Centre of Physical Activity Across the Lifespan, Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Victoria 3065, Australia
4School of Exercise, Biomedical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia
5The Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, and Exercise & Eating Disorders, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
6Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
7Hebrew SeniorLife and Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Center on Aging, Tufts University, Boston, MA 02111-1524, USA

Received 2 December 2010; Revised 28 March 2011; Accepted 14 April 2011

Academic Editor: Harri Sievänen

Copyright © 2011 Sarah Turner et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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