Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Journal of Osteoporosis
Volume 2012, Article ID 129760, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/129760
Research Article

Sex- and Age-Related Differences in Bone Microarchitecture in Men Relative to Women Assessed by High-Resolution Peripheral Quantitative Computed Tomography

1Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
2Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, Metabolism and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
3Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA

Received 5 September 2011; Accepted 31 October 2011

Academic Editor: Pawel Szulc

Copyright © 2012 Shreyasee Amin and Sundeep Khosla. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The trabecular and cortical compartments of bone each contributes to bone strength. Until recently, assessment of trabecular and cortical microstructure has required a bone biopsy. Now, trabecular and cortical microstructure of peripheral bone sites can be determined noninvasively using high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT). Studies that have used HR-pQCT to evaluate cohorts of both men and women have provided novel insights into the changes in bone microarchitecture that occur with age between the sexes, which may help to explain the lower fracture incidence in older men relative to women. This review will highlight observations from these studies on both the sex- and age-related differences in trabecular and cortical microstructure that may underlie the differences in bone strength, and thereby fracture risk, between men and women.