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Journal of Osteoporosis
Volume 2013, Article ID 760586, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/760586
Research Article

Black Tea May Be a Prospective Adjunct for Calcium Supplementation to Prevent Early Menopausal Bone Loss in a Rat Model of Osteoporosis

1Pre-Clinical Physiology Laboratory, Tripura Institute of Paramedical Sciences, Hapania, Amtali, Tripura 799 130, India
2Formerly Department of Physiology, Presidency College, Kolkata, West Bengal, India
3Department of Physiology, Hooghly Mohsin College, Chinsurah, Hooghly, West Bengal, India
4Department of Physiology, Kalyani Mahavidyalaya, Kalyani, Nadia, West Bengal, India
5Department of Physiology, Serampore College, 9/1 William Carey Road, Serampore, Hooghly, West Bengal, India

Received 30 November 2012; Revised 10 June 2013; Accepted 20 June 2013

Academic Editor: Harri Sievänen

Copyright © 2013 Asankur Sekhar Das et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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