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Journal of Osteoporosis
Volume 2015, Article ID 737521, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/737521
Research Article

Associations of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Intake with Bone Mineral Density in Postmenopausal Women

1Department of Health Sciences, University of Colorado Colorado Springs, 1420 Austin Bluffs Parkway, Colorado Springs, CO 80918, USA
2Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Arizona, 1177 E. 4th Street, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
3Nutritional Sciences Department, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0036, USA
4Department of Physiology, 3017 N. Gaia Place, Tucson, AZ 85745, USA

Received 31 July 2014; Revised 16 January 2015; Accepted 19 January 2015

Academic Editor: Jun Iwamoto

Copyright © 2015 Margaret Harris et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

A secondary analysis of cross-sectional data was analyzed from 6 cohorts (Fall 1995–Fall 1997) of postmenopausal women (; years) participating in the Bone Estrogen Strength Training (BEST) study (a 12-month, block-randomized, clinical trial). Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured at femur neck and trochanter, lumbar spine (L2–L4), and total body BMD using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Mean dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) intakes were assessed using 8 days of diet records. Multiple linear regression was used to examine associations between dietary PUFAs and BMD. Covariates included in the models were total energy intake, body weight at year 1, years after menopause, exercise, use of hormone therapy (HT), total calcium, and total iron intakes. In the total sample, lumbar spine and total body BMD had significant negative associations with dietary PUFA intake at . In the non-HT group, no significant associations between dietary PUFA intake and BMD were seen. In the HT group, significant inverse associations with dietary PUFA intake were seen in the spine, total body, and Ward’s triangle BMD, suggesting that HT may influence PUFA associations with BMD. This study is registered with clinicaltrials.gov, identifier: NCT00000399.