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Journal of Pregnancy
Volume 2011, Article ID 123717, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/123717
Review Article

Disrupted Balance of Angiogenic and Antiangiogenic Signalings in Preeclampsia

1Department of Pathology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama 236-0004, Japan
2Department of Obstetrics, Yokohama City University Medical Center, Yokohama 232-0024, Japan
3Department of Pathology, Yokohama City University Medical Center, Yokohama 232-0024, Japan

Received 16 November 2010; Accepted 12 January 2011

Academic Editor: Antonio Farina

Copyright © 2011 Mitsuko Furuya et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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