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Journal of Pregnancy
Volume 2012, Article ID 582748, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/582748
Review Article

Impact of Oxidative Stress in Fetal Programming

Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 11-029 Bressler Research Building, 655 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA

Received 5 April 2012; Revised 7 June 2012; Accepted 21 June 2012

Academic Editor: Janna Morrison

Copyright © 2012 Loren P. Thompson and Yazan Al-Hasan. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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