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Journal of Pregnancy
Volume 2016, Article ID 1454707, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1454707
Research Article

Opinions and Practice of US-Based Obstetrician-Gynecologists regarding Vitamin D Screening and Supplementation of Pregnant Women

1Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA 30912, USA
2The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Washington, DC 20024, USA

Received 11 May 2016; Revised 22 July 2016; Accepted 31 July 2016

Academic Editor: Deborah A. Wing

Copyright © 2016 Sara A. Mohamed et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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