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Journal of Pregnancy
Volume 2016, Article ID 1853935, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1853935
Research Article

Pregnant Women in Louisiana Are Not Meeting Dietary Seafood Recommendations

1Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA
2Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA

Received 3 March 2016; Revised 18 May 2016; Accepted 22 June 2016

Academic Editor: Ellinor Olander

Copyright © 2016 M. L. Drewery et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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