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Journal of Pregnancy
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 4293431, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4293431
Research Article

A Low-Protein Diet Enhances Angiotensin II Production in the Lung of Pregnant Rats but Not Nonpregnant Rats

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA

Received 16 December 2015; Revised 15 March 2016; Accepted 28 March 2016

Academic Editor: Tamas Zakar

Copyright © 2016 Haijun Gao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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