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Journal of Pathogens
Volume 2012, Article ID 627036, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/627036
Research Article

A New Generation Microarray for the Simultaneous Detection and Identification of Yersinia pestis and Bacillus anthracis in Food

1Canadian Food Inspection Agency, National Centres for Animal Disease, Lethbridge Laboratory, P.O. Box 640, Lethbridge, AB, Canada T1J 3Z4
2Department of Biological Sciences, D872 University Hall, 4401 University Drive, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, AB, Canada T1K 3M4

Received 23 June 2012; Revised 2 August 2012; Accepted 5 August 2012

Academic Editor: Hin-Chung Wong

Copyright © 2012 Crown. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The use of microarrays as a multiple analytic system has generated increased interest and provided a powerful analytical tool for the simultaneous detection of pathogens in a single experiment. A wide array of applications for this technology has been reported. A low density oligonucleotide microarray was generated from the genetic sequences of Y. pestis and B. anthracis and used to fabricate a microarray chip. The new generation chip, consisting of 2,240 spots in 4 quadrants with the capability of stripping/rehybridization, was designated as “Y-PESTIS/B-ANTHRACIS 4x2K Array.” The chip was tested for specificity using DNA from a panel of bacteria that may be potentially present in food. In all, 37 unique Y. pestis-specific and 83 B. anthracis-specific probes were identified. The microarray assay distinguished Y. pestis and B. anthracis from the other bacterial species tested and correctly identified the Y. pestis-specific oligonucleotide probes using DNA extracted from experimentally inoculated milk samples. Using a whole genome amplification method, the assay was able to detect as low as 1 ng genomic DNA as the start sample. The results suggest that oligonucleotide microarray can specifically detect and identify Y. pestis and B. anthracis and may be a potentially useful diagnostic tool for detecting and confirming the organisms in food during a bioterrorism event.