Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Journal of Pathogens
Volume 2017, Article ID 7126258, 5 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7126258
Research Article

Evaluation of CAMP-Like Effect, Biofilm Formation, and Discrimination of Candida africana from Vaginal Candida albicans Species

1Basic Sciences in Infectious Diseases Research Center, Department of Parasitology and Mycology, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
2Department of Parasitology and Mycology, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

Correspondence should be addressed to Keyvan Pakshir; moc.liamg@krihskap

Received 31 August 2017; Accepted 7 November 2017; Published 26 November 2017

Academic Editor: Mario M. D’Elios

Copyright © 2017 Keyvan Pakshir et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. Y. Shan, S. Fan, X. Liu, and J. Li, “Prevalence of Candida albicans-closely related yeasts, Candida africana and Candida dubliniensis, in vulvovaginal candidiasis,” Medical Mycology, vol. 52, no. 6, pp. 636–640, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. H.-J. Tietz, M. Hopp, A. Schmalreck, W. Sterry, and V. Czaika, “Candida africana sp. nov., a new human pathogen or a variant of Candida albicans?” Mycoses, vol. 44, no. 11-12, pp. 437–445, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. H. J. Tietz, A. Küssner, M. Thanos et al., “Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of unusual vaginal isolates of Candida albicans from Africa,” J Clin Microbiol, vol. 33, pp. 2462–2465, 1995. View at Google Scholar
  4. O. Romeo and G. Criseo, “Molecular epidemiology of Candida albicans and its closely related yeasts Candida dubliniensis and Candida africana,” Journal of Clinical Microbiology, vol. 47, no. 1, pp. 212–214, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. N. E. Nnadi, G. M. Ayanbimpe, F. Scordino et al., “Isolation and molecular characterization of Candida africana from Jos, Nigeria,” Medical Mycology, vol. 50, no. 7, pp. 765–767, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. S. A. Yazdanparast, S. Khodavaisy, H. Fakhim et al., “Molecular characterization of highly susceptible Candida africana from vulvovaginal candidiasis,” Mycopathologia, vol. 180, no. 5-6, pp. 317–323, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. O. Romeo and G. Criseo, “First molecular method for discriminating between Candida africana, Candida albicans, and Candida dubliniensis by using hwp1 gene,” Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease, vol. 62, no. 2, pp. 230–233, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. J. F. Staab, S. D. Bradway, P. L. Fidel, and P. Sundstrom, “Adhesive and mammalian transglutaminase substrate properties of Candida albicans Hwp1,” Science, vol. 283, no. 5407, pp. 1535–1538, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. N. Yigit, E. Aktas, S. Dagistan, and A. Ayyildiz, “Investigating biofilm production, coagulase and hemolytic activity in Candida species isolated from denture stomatitis patients,” The Eurasian Journal of Medicine, vol. 43, no. 11, pp. 27–32, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  10. G. Gokce, N. Cerikcioglu, and A. Yagci, “Acid proteinase, phospholipase, and biofilm production of Candida species isolated from blood cultures,” Mycopathologia, vol. 164, no. 265, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  11. S. D. Elek and E. Levy, “Distribution of hæmolysins in pathogenic and non-pathogenic staphylococci,” The Journal of Pathology, vol. 62, no. 4, pp. 541–554, 1950. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  12. M. J. Manns, D. M. Mosser, and H. R. Bukley, “Production of a hemolytic factor by Candida albicans. Infect Immun,” in Infect Immun, vol. 62, pp. 5154–5156, 1994. View at Google Scholar
  13. M. F. Negri, E. Guilhermetti, A. A. Alves, R. Paulac, and T. I. E. Svidzinski, “Hemolytic activity and production of germ tubes related to pathogenic potential of clinical isolates of Candida albicans,” J Basic Appl Pharm Sci, pp. 31–89, 2010. View at Google Scholar
  14. K. Christie, N. Atkins, and E. Munch-Petersen, “A note on a lytic phenomenon shown by group B streptococci,” Immunology & Cell Biology, vol. 22, no. 3, pp. 197–200, 1944. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  15. F. O. Ruíz, G. Gerbaldo, M. J. García, W. Giordano, L. Pascual, and I. L. Barberis, “Synergistic effect between two bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances produced by lactobacilli strains with inhibitory activity for Streptococcus agalactiae,” Current Microbiology, vol. 64, no. 4, pp. 349–356, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. M. E. Hensler, G. Y. Liu, S. Sobczak, K. Benirschke, V. Nizet, and G. P. Heldt, “Virulence role of group B Streptococcusβ-hemolysin/cytolysin in a neonatal rabbit model of early-onset pulmonary infection,” The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 191, no. 8, pp. 1287–1291, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. B. Larsen and G. R. G. Monif, “Understanding the bacterial flora of the female genital tract,” Clinical Infectious Diseases, vol. 32, no. 4, pp. e69–e77, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. C. M. Corbishley, “Microbial flora of the vagina and cervix,” Journal of Clinical Pathology, vol. 30, no. 8, pp. 745–748, 1977. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. K. Pakshir, M. Yazdani, and R. Kimiaghalam, “Etiology of vaginal candidiasis in Shiraz, Southern Iran,” Research Journal of Microbiology, vol. 2, no. 9, pp. 696–700, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. M. Jafari, S. Salari, K. Pakshir, and K. Zomorodian, “Exoenzyme activity and possibility identification of Candida dubliniensis among Candida albicans species isolated from vaginal candidiasis,” Microbial Pathogenesis, vol. 110, pp. 73–77, 2017. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  21. K. Makimura, S. Y. Murayama, and H. Yamaguchi, “Detection of a wide range of medically important fungi by the polymerase chain reaction,” Journal of Medical Microbiology, vol. 40, no. 5, pp. 358–364, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. G. Luo, L. P. Samaranayake, and J. Y. Y. Yau, “Candida species exhibit differential in vitro hemolytic activities,” Journal of Clinical Microbiology, vol. 39, no. 8, pp. 2971–2974, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. J. D. Sobel, “Vulvovaginal candidosis,” The Lancet, vol. 369, no. 9577, pp. 1961–1971, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. O. Romeo and G. Criseo, “Candida africana and its closest relatives,” Mycoses, vol. 54, no. 6, pp. 475–486, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. R. Gumral, B. Sancak, A. B. Guzel, M. A. Saraçli, and M. Ilkit, “Lack of Candida africana and Candida dubliniensis in vaginal Candida albicans isolates in Turkey using HWP1 gene polymorphisms,” Mycopathologia, vol. 172, no. 1, pp. 73–76, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. M. J. Mucci, M. L. Cuestas, M. F. Landanburu, and M. T. Mujica, “Prevalence of Candida albicans, Candida dubliniensis and Candida africana in pregnant women suffering from vulvovaginal candidiasis in Argentina,” Revista Iberoamericana de Micología, vol. 34, no. 2, pp. 72–76, 2017. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. G. Hazirolan, H. Altun, R. Gumral, N. Gursoy, B. Otlu, and B. Sancak, “Prevalence of Candida africana and Candida dubliniensis, in vulvovaginal candidiasis: first Turkish Candida africana isolates from vulvovaginal candidiasis,” Journal de Mycologie Médicale, vol. 27, no. 3, pp. 376–381, 2017. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  28. K. R. Mukhia and A. D. Urhekar, “Biofilm production by various Candida species isolated from various clinical specimens,” I J S R, vol. 5, no. 6, pp. 2388–2392, 2016. View at Google Scholar
  29. K. Pakshir, K. Zomorodian, M. Karamitalab, M. Jafari, H. Taraz, and H. Ebrahimi, “Phospholipase, esterase and hemolytic activities of Candida spp. isolated from onychomycosis and oral lichen planus lesions,” Journal de Mycologie Médicale, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 113–118, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. A. Dogen, R. Gumral, and M. Ilkit, “Haemolytic and co-haemolytic (CAMP-like) activity in dermatophytes,” Mycoses, vol. 58, no. 1, pp. 40–47, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  31. P. Schaufuss, J. Brasch, and U. Steller, “Dermatophytes can trigger cooperative (CAMP-like) haemolytic reactions,” British Journal of Dermatology, vol. 153, no. 3, pp. 584–590, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus