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Journal of Parasitology Research
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 101848, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/101848
Review Article

The Influence of MHC and Immunoglobulins A and E on Host Resistance to Gastrointestinal Nematodes in Sheep

1Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute and Western Australian Biomedical Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA 6845, Australia
2Department of Animal Production and Public Health, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Glasgow, Bearsden Road, Glasgow G61 1QH, UK

Received 29 November 2010; Revised 17 February 2011; Accepted 18 February 2011

Academic Editor: Alvin A. Gajadhar

Copyright © 2011 C. Y. Lee et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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