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Journal of Parasitology Research
Volume 2011, Article ID 512154, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/512154
Review Article

Excretory-Secretory Products from Hookworm L3 and Adult Worms Suppress Proinflammatory Cytokines in Infected Individuals

1Centro de Pesquisas René Rachou, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Avenida Augusto de Lima 1715, 30190-002 Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil
2Departamento de Parasitologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Avenida Antônio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil
3Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Tropical Medicine, The George Washington University Medical Center, 2300 Eye Street NW, Washington, DC 20037, USA

Received 30 November 2010; Revised 18 March 2011; Accepted 29 March 2011

Academic Editor: Takeshi Agatsuma

Copyright © 2011 Stefan Michael Geiger et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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