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Journal of Parasitology Research
Volume 2012, Article ID 165126, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/165126
Review Article

Innate Immune Activation and Subversion of Mammalian Functions by Leishmania Lipophosphoglycan

1Department of Cell Biology, School of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, FMRP/USP, 14049-900, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil
2Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 S. Euclid Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA

Received 24 August 2011; Accepted 10 November 2011

Academic Editor: Hugo D. Lujan

Copyright © 2012 Luis H. Franco et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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