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Journal of Parasitology Research
Volume 2012, Article ID 748206, 24 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/748206
Review Article

Host-Parasite Interaction: Parasite-Derived and -Induced Proteases That Degrade Human Extracellular Matrix

Departamento de Biología Celular, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Aveinda Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, 07360 México, DF, Mexico

Received 24 February 2012; Accepted 7 May 2012

Academic Editor: Barbara Papadopoulou

Copyright © 2012 Carolina Piña-Vázquez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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