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Journal of Parasitology Research
Volume 2014, Article ID 172582, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/172582
Research Article

Investigating the Chaperone Properties of a Novel Heat Shock Protein, Hsp70.c, from Trypanosoma brucei

Biomedical and Biotechnology Research Unit (BioBRU), Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Biotechnology, Rhodes University, P.O. Box 94, Grahamstown 6140, South Africa

Received 31 October 2013; Revised 23 December 2013; Accepted 9 January 2014; Published 24 February 2014

Academic Editor: Takeshi Agatsuma

Copyright © 2014 Adélle Burger et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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