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Journal of Parasitology Research
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 547439, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/547439
Research Article

First Report of Aprostocetus asthenogmus (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) in South America and Parasitizing Eggs of Triatominae Vectors of Chagas Disease

1Unidade de Medicina Tropical, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo (UFES), Avenida Marechal Campos 1468, 29043-900 Vitória, ES, Brazil
2Núcleo de Entomologia e Malacologia do Espírito Santo, Secretaria de Estado da Saúde do Espírito Santo, Rua Pedro Zangrande 381, 29164-020 Serra, ES, Brazil
3Laboratório de Biodiversidade de Insetos, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo (UFES), Avenida Marechal Campos 1468, 29043-900 Vitória, ES, Brazil
4Setor de Parasitologia, Departamento de Patologia, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo (UFES), Avenida Marechal Campos 1468, 29043-900 Vitória, ES, Brazil
5Escola Superior de Ciências da Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Vitória (EMESCAM), Avenida Nossa Senhora da Penha 2190, 29045-402 Vitória, ES, Brazil
6Centro Universitário do Espírito Santo (UNESC), Rua Fioravante Rossi 2930, 29703-855 Colatina, ES, Brazil

Received 19 September 2013; Accepted 7 November 2013; Published 19 January 2014

Academic Editor: Dave Chadee

Copyright © 2014 Claudiney Biral dos Santos et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

We report for the first time the parasitism of eggs of two triatomine Chagas disease vectors, Triatoma infestans and T. vitticeps, by the microhymenopterous parasitoid Aprostocetus asthenogmus. We also describe the first identification of this parasitoid in South America. A. asthenogmus were captured near unparasitized triatomine colonies in the municipality of Vitória, state of Espírito Santo, Brazil, and placed into pots with recently laid triatomine eggs. After 24 days, we observed wasps emerging from T. infestans and T. vitticeps eggs. Several characteristics of this parasitoid species suggest that it could be a potential biological control agent of triatomine species.