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Journal of Parasitology Research
Volume 2015, Article ID 361021, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/361021
Research Article

Comparison of Repellency Effect of Mosquito Repellents for DEET, Citronella, and Fennel Oil

1Department of Bio-Industrial Technologies, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701, Republic of Korea
2Department of Dermatology, Konkuk University Hospital, Seoul 143-729, Republic of Korea
3Cosmetics Research Team, Department of Pharmaceutical and Medical Device Research, Ministry of Food and Drug Safety, Chungcheongbuk-do 363-700, Republic of Korea
4Department of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea

Received 23 April 2015; Revised 7 September 2015; Accepted 7 September 2015

Academic Editor: Dave Chadee

Copyright © 2015 Jong Kwang Yoon et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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