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Journal of Parasitology Research
Volume 2015, Article ID 368064, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/368064
Review Article

Complex Membrane Channel Blockade: A Unifying Hypothesis for the Prodromal and Acute Neuropsychiatric Sequelae Resulting from Exposure to the Antimalarial Drug Mefloquine

Plant and Animal Toxicology Group, School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation, Charles Sturt University, Boorooma Street, Wagga Wagga, NSW 2650, Australia

Received 22 July 2015; Accepted 28 September 2015

Academic Editor: Ashley M. Croft

Copyright © 2015 Jane C. Quinn. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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