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Journal of Parasitology Research
Volume 2015, Article ID 587131, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/587131
Review Article

Human Coinfection with Borrelia burgdorferi and Babesia microti in the United States

Department of Biology, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101, USA

Received 23 September 2015; Accepted 8 November 2015

Academic Editor: Emmanuel Serrano Ferron

Copyright © 2015 Kristen L. Knapp and Nancy A. Rice. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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