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Journal of Robotics
Volume 2010, Article ID 217867, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/217867
Research Article

Iterative Learning without Reinforcement or Reward for Multijoint Movements: A Revisit of Bernstein's DOF Problem on Dexterity

1Research Organization of Science and Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577, Japan
2RIKEN-TRI Collaboration Center for Human-Interactive Robot Research, Nagoya, Aichi 463-0003, Japan
3Organization for the Promotion of Advanced Research, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395, Japan

Received 5 November 2009; Accepted 17 May 2010

Academic Editor: Noriyasu Homma

Copyright © 2010 Suguru Arimoto et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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