Table of Contents
Journal of Respiratory Medicine
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 797050, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/797050
Clinical Study

Inhalation of Nebulized Diesel Particulate Matter: A Safety Trial in Healthy Humans

1School of Human Kinetics, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Greater Sudbury, ON, Canada P3E 2C6
2Medical Sciences Division, Northern Ontario School of Medicine, ON, Canada P3E 2C6

Received 15 May 2013; Revised 17 December 2013; Accepted 19 December 2013; Published 4 February 2014

Academic Editor: Dimitar Sajkov

Copyright © 2014 Sandra C. Dorman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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