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Journal of Sensors
Volume 2016, Article ID 8154809, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8154809
Research Article

Sensor-Based Technique for Manually Scanned Hand-Held Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

1Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
2Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
3Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
4Department of Internal Medicine, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA

Received 6 August 2015; Revised 24 November 2015; Accepted 25 November 2015

Academic Editor: Vincenzo Spagnolo

Copyright © 2016 Paritosh Pande et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Hand-held optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging probes offer flexibility to image sites that are otherwise challenging to access. While the majority of hand-held imaging probes utilize galvanometer- or MEMS-scanning mirrors to transversely scan the imaging beam, these probes are commonly limited to lateral fields-of-view (FOV) of only a few millimeters. The use of a freehand manually scanned probe can significantly increase the lateral FOV. However, using the traditional fixed-rate triggering scheme for data acquisition in a manually scanned probe results in imaging artifacts due to variations in the scan velocity of the imaging probe. These artifacts result in a structurally inaccurate image of the sample. In this paper, we present a sensor-based manual scanning technique for OCT imaging, where real-time feedback from an optical motion sensor is used to trigger data acquisition. This technique is able to circumvent the problem of motion artifacts during manual scanning by adaptively altering the trigger rate based on the instantaneous scan velocity, enabling OCT imaging over a large lateral FOV. The feasibility of the proposed technique is demonstrated by imaging several biological and nonbiological samples.