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Journal of Skin Cancer
Volume 2012, Article ID 680410, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/680410
Review Article

Which Are the Cells of Origin in Merkel Cell Carcinoma?

Department of Dermatology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistraße 52, 20246 Hamburg, Germany

Received 12 October 2012; Accepted 27 November 2012

Academic Editor: Boban M. Erovic

Copyright © 2012 Thomas Tilling and Ingrid Moll. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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