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Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume 2016, Article ID 3968393, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3968393
Review Article

Graded Exercise Testing Protocols for the Determination of VO2max: Historical Perspectives, Progress, and Future Considerations

1Health, Exercise & Sports Sciences Department, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA
2Department of Kinesiology, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, Eau Claire, WI, USA
3Recreation, Exercise & Sports Science Department, Western State Colorado University, Gunnison, CO, USA

Received 2 August 2016; Revised 14 October 2016; Accepted 31 October 2016

Academic Editor: Andrew Bosch

Copyright © 2016 Nicholas M. Beltz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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