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Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume 2016, Article ID 7498359, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7498359
Research Article

The Influence of Methylsulfonylmethane on Inflammation-Associated Cytokine Release before and following Strenuous Exercise

School of Health Studies, The University of Memphis, Memphis, TN, USA

Received 1 September 2016; Accepted 29 September 2016

Academic Editor: Ian L. Swaine

Copyright © 2016 Mariè van der Merwe and Richard J. Bloomer. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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